As of 30th September 2014, Internet Archaeology is an open access journal and will no longer charge a subscription for access to any past or future content.

Several things spurred this decision.

Over the last 4 years, Internet Archaeology have made active efforts in this direction, by switching to a default CC-BY license, opening up back issues with an annual rolling wall, and by adjusting subscription charges accordingly.

During this time, Internet Archaeology also witnessed a marked increase in quality, funded submissions, including several themed issues. Internet Archaeology has always tried to be more than ‘just a journal’, exploring the possibilities the web can offer and have delved into many different publication formats.

Being a small operation meant Internet Archaeology could be responsive to changes in the wider scholarly landscape, and the journal has simply reached the tipping point.

Funded through JISC’s eLib programme, Internet Archaeology was launched in 1995 as a born-digital journal and published its first issue in 1996. It was also open access before the term was really invented. As part of the initial funding agreement, and as the only sustainable option for us at that time, institutional subscriptions were introduced in 2000, followed by subscriptions for individuals in 2001. By 2010, the open access debate had truly sparked into life and it was around that time that we started to publish open access content where funds were available. By the start of 2014 however, over 50% of the articles we had published were open access, so we have decided to make open access the focus of our efforts from now on.

There will always be challenges of course but I’m very excited to be taking the journal into this new phase.

Judith Winters, Editor
29 September 2014

 

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Visit them here: http://intarch.ac.uk

37 volumes of fabulous content:

The latest volume contains:

Human Exploitation of Aquatic Landscapes

A special issue edited by Ricardo Fernandes and John Meadows

This themed issue has been funded by the Graduate School “Human Development in Landscapes”, University of Kiel with additional funding from the Institute for Ecosystem Research, University of Kiel and the Centre for Baltic and Scandinavian Archaeology, Schloss Gottorf.

Beneath Still Waters – Multistage Aquatic Exploitation of Euryale ferox (Salisb.) during the Acheulian
Naama Goren-Inbar, Yoel Melamed, Irit Zohar, Kumar Akhilesh and Shanti Pappu

Proposal received: October 2013; Submitted: April 2014 ; Published: September 2014
Words: 10,154 (154KB); Images: 10 (2MB)
Summary | Table of Contents

4200 New Shell Mound Sites in the Southern Red Sea
M.G. Meredith-Williams, N.Hausmann, R.H.Inglis and G.N. Bailey

Proposal received: September 2013; Submitted: June 2014 ; Published: September 2014
Words: 7183 (94KB); Images: 10 (583KB)
Summary | Table of Contents

Fishing and Fish Consumption in the Swahili Communities of East Africa, 700–1400 CE
Eréndira M. Quintana Morales and Mark Horton

Proposal received: September 2013; Submitted: April 2014 ; Published: September 2014
Words: 6542 (92KB); Images: 11 (634KB)
Summary | Table of Contents

The ‘Wretched Poor’ and the Sea: Contest and exploitation of Achill Island’s historic maritime landscape
Shannon Dunn and Chuck Meide

Proposal received: September 2013; Submitted: May 2014 ; Published: September 2014
Words: 9963 (123KB); Images: 77 (15MB)
Summary | Table of Contents

Direct Evidence for Bottom-fishing in Archaeological Whelks (Buccinum undatum)
Greg Campbell and Michael Russell

Proposal received: September 2013; Submitted: April 2014 ; Published: September 2014
Words: 6797 (103KB); Images: 9 (931KB)
Summary | Table of Contents

Shellfish from the Bronze Age Site of Clos des Châtaigniers (Mathieu, Normandy, France)
Caroline Mougne, Catherine Dupont, David Giazzon, Laurent Quesnel

Proposal received: September 2013; Submitted: May 2014 ; Published: September 2014
Words: 6807 (110KB); Images: 9 (8.3MB)
Summary | Table of Contents

 

Internet Archaeology publishes quality academic content and explores the potential of electronic publication through the inclusion of video, audio, searchable data sets, full-colour images, visualisations, animations and interactive mapping. Internet Archaeology is international in scope, a true journal without borders, and all content is peer-reviewed. Internet Archaeology is hosted by the Department of Archaeology at the University of York and digitally archived by the Archaeology Data Service.

 

[Internet Archaeology]

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