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The Potential Impacts of Scottish Independence upon Scottish Archaeology.
#1
Tom Gardner, an undergraduate student (be kind people, he is going to be a good archaeologists), has conducted interviews with several archaeologists looking at the potential impact of an independent Scotland on archaeology and heritage. The full article can be seen at the Retrospect Journal website.

[INDENT]Abstract
As the referendum on Scottish independence in 2014 approaches, each Scot has to make the decision as to the future of our country. It is a difficult decision to make and one which will influence the careers of all of Scots. I feel that as an archaeology student who hopes to enter into applied and academic archaeology it is important to weigh up the possible ramifications of this decision upon the major fields or archaeology. This article cites interviews with Dr. Gordon Thomas and Professor Ian Ralston of Edinburgh University Archaeology department to substantiate its claims but cannot claim to be definitive; both because of its limited length and the uncertainty of the future.
[/INDENT]
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#2
Its an interesting question and thanks for posting, but that has to be one of the worst designed blogs that I've ever seen. Grey on black and no paragraph breaks? I might cut and paste into Word, rather than strain my eyes...
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#3
Several archaeolgists? Its an interesting start to an article, but doesnt seem to go anywhere yet.
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#4
Antipesto Wrote:Several archaeolgists? Its an interesting start to an article, but doesnt seem to go anywhere yet.

It is meant to be more of a debate piece. You can leave comments on the article. Maybe, you can direct it somewhereWink.
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#5
People better be kind or ai Will whoop ass Smile Tom is going to be a damn good archaeologist. and is pretty damn brave to place this in teh public forum with a fascinating question. I have yet to read properly as I am far from the snowfields of Scotland at teh World Arch Conference in Jordan, where this question would have been a good one?

I think comments - critique and positive suggestion would be great.
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#6
well, could there be potential for looking further at 'more solely Scottish commercial contractors' expanding to take up any potential construction boom work? Brief straw poll of units of north and their expected reaction to such a boom maybe? Would a proposed Scottish Govt create a 'protectionist' policy for archaeological units (local govt works favouring local companies over larger 'English' ones like Wessex, or simply tax breaks/penalties to encourage Scottish set-ups or give them a home-ground advantage) or would it be the same situation as now, in all but name?
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#7
Antipesto Wrote:Would a proposed Scottish Govt create a 'protectionist' policy for archaeological units (local govt works favouring local companies over larger 'English' ones like Wessex, or simply tax breaks/penalties to encourage Scottish set-ups or give them a home-ground advantage) or would it be the same situation as now, in all but name?

The same section of the Blog leapt at me - but more on the basis that the 'Yes Scotland' campaign explicitly wishes to remain within the EU hence freedom of trade and movement across national borders. As such it would be very hard (and subject to challenge) to introduce such an obstacle. I think this is one aspect where the Blog piece lacked foresight, a surge in archaeological enterprise (especially if promoted to underwrite the diverge of Scotland from RUK) would most likely support many companies that are not headquartered in Scotland as well as those that are ... in the same manner RUK Universities would still be likely to do fieldwork and PhDs within Scotland as they would in any other neighbouring EU country. The only catch for RUK companies would be if an independent 'within-EU' Scotland was neighbours to an ex-EU RUK ... ahh referendums.
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#8
There is a big big big question about EU and Scotland. Even if as the 'Yes Scotland' are able to negotiate from within the EU thus never leave, Scotland still is negotiating what EU treaties and legislation it will sign up to which if negotaition take time could lead to issue of funding being with-held after a independent Scotland left the UK but was still in the process of negotiation of which EU treaties and legislation it would sign up for. What is important to note in all of the debate this is has never occured before thus will not neatly fit into the three current stages of 'EU applicant', 'EU Candidate' or 'EU member' thus with fit into an undefind 4th stage.
Don't forget this would happen with all international bodies including UN which can lead to some benifits, if a indepentant Scotland sign up to Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage it will be able to provide it own nominations places to unceso World Heritage site. Also after a independent Scotland gain EU membership it could find it own voice within the group, be it as Strong as France, Germany and UK or viewed has much as Greece, Ireland and Portugal would have to be seen.
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#9
Manuport Wrote:..... freedom of trade and movement across national borders. As such it would be very hard (and subject to challenge) to introduce such an obstacle. I think this is one aspect where the Blog piece lacked foresight

Not at all. There are many EU and EEA countries who have 'protective' clauses regarding archaeological excavation. This could be based upon a licensing system, legal limitations on who can excavate and non-competitive arrangements...One great thing about the EU is that it has the foresight to place culture and the protection of cultural heritage above commerce. Scotland has the freedom to make its own arrangements for cultural protection if it is either in or out of the EU.....
With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
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#10
Looking back of the effects of devolution in Scotland and Wales, the main effect has been to change the rhetoric and focus of cultural heritage - the celebration of national icons and nation-building, rather than academic 'interest' or 'importance', and a recognition by politicians that heritage matters. I would say that it has had almost no effect on the willingness of the state to fund heritage projects unless there is a clear additional benefit (in the form of tourism or economic development).
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