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Archaeology in Schools
#1
Hi everyone!

Have recently left the world of archaeology to train to become a primary school teacher!

I'm looking to run a number of archaeology classes and was looking for some advice from you learned chaps and chappesses

1. Lots of children regularly ask 'How did did it end up becoming buried?' How would you answer that one, especially out in the fields?

2. I've moved to Scotland and am trying to enhance my finds handling collection that I've built over the years (legitimately from discards mind!) with (mainly metalwork) bits such as coins, brooches, shot, etc. that I used to have access to through my unit but can't access any more. I don't want to buy off Ebay/antique shops as I provenance the material and Scotland don't have the PAS - does anyone have any bright ideas?

Thanks in advance! :face-approve:
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#2
Dirty Boy Wrote:Hi everyone!

Have recently left the world of archaeology to train to become a primary school teacher!

I'm looking to run a number of archaeology classes and was looking for some advice from you learned chaps and chappesses

1. Lots of children regularly ask 'How did did it end up becoming buried?' How would you answer that one, especially out in the fields?

2. I've moved to Scotland and am trying to enhance my finds handling collection that I've built over the years (legitimately from discards mind!) with (mainly metalwork) bits such as coins, brooches, shot, etc. that I used to have access to through my unit but can't access any more. I don't want to buy off Ebay/antique shops as I provenance the material and Scotland don't have the PAS - does anyone have any bright ideas?

Thanks in advance! :face-approve:

Excellent! Congratulations and good luck!

1. Worms. Kids love worms don't they?

2. Buy a metal detector and head off to the fields. No-one will mind, but remember to do it at night so your delicate instrument isn't damaged by the UV light... Wink
I reserve the right to change my mind. It's called learning.
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#3
Dirty Boy Wrote:2. I've moved to Scotland and am trying to enhance my finds handling collection that I've built over the years (legitimately from discards mind!) with (mainly metalwork) bits such as coins, brooches, shot, etc. that I used to have access to through my unit but can't access any more. I don't want to buy off Ebay/antique shops as I provenance the material and Scotland don't have the PAS - does anyone have any bright ideas?

I would probably recommend getting in touch with local units, local museums, local archaeology groups/societies and RCHME/Historic Scotland and asking them. They will point you in the direction of provenanced discards and may be able to offer other support and advice. Not sure which part of Scotland you've moved to but the local Historic Environment Record should be able to help you with finding local contacts. List of contact details for HERs in Scotland is available at http://smrforum-scotland.org.uk/her-contacts/ .
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#4
1. I usually tell people, if its a flat field, that the features just used to be c.30cm deeper but the farmer's ploughed the top off? [worth remembering when talking about 'entrance gaps' too!]

2. Who says you're cut off from your previous supply? Smile
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#5
All the best for your new career

there is a great experiment you can do with layers of different coloured soils in a clear jar with some tasty veg on top just add a couple of worms and see how they mix it all up. It's out there on the net.

Archgirl 19 is right contact units and museums there is often tons of stuff sitting basements that could be really useful as teaching aids.

Have a look at YAC they have some great activities for Children

There are some excellent American webs site for schools archaeology along with our own BBC

I have found that the good old sand pit excavation goes down a treat even drawing on graph paper using a planning frame is an activity children can do if you keep it simple

The only limit to the teaching resource that is archaeology is your imagination in using it. Though do try everything yourself first from the child's perspective and don't forget health and safety considerations for children are different from those for adults.
Have fun:face-approve::face-approve:
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#6
Dirty Boy Wrote:Hi everyone!

Have recently left the world of archaeology to train to become a primary school teacher!

I'm looking to run a number of archaeology classes and was looking for some advice from you learned chaps and chappesses

1. Lots of children regularly ask 'How did did it end up becoming buried?' How would you answer that one, especially out in the fields?

2. I've moved to Scotland and am trying to enhance my finds handling collection that I've built over the years (legitimately from discards mind!) with (mainly metalwork) bits such as coins, brooches, shot, etc. that I used to have access to through my unit but can't access any more. I don't want to buy off Ebay/antique shops as I provenance the material and Scotland don't have the PAS - does anyone have any bright ideas?

Thanks in advance! :face-approve:

For #2 Archaeology Scotland are a good bet to get in contact with http://www.archaeologyscotland.org.uk/ Also speak to Units (e.g. CFA, Headland, GUARD and AOC) if they have any discards you could have. Local HER/Archaeologists are a good bet, probably not HS or RCAHMS as much.
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#7
Dirty Boy Wrote:Hi everyone!

Have recently left the world of archaeology to train to become a primary school teacher!

I'm looking to run a number of archaeology classes and was looking for some advice from you learned chaps and chappesses

1. Lots of children regularly ask 'How did did it end up becoming buried?' How would you answer that one, especially out in the fields?

:face-approve:

I'm not sure of the limits of your kids understanding, but you could take them to beamish and show them the kitchen midden (if they have one) and the pig treading in/spreading stuff around. Explain how rubbish goes from the kitchen, to midden to being spread on fields and/or filling up any hole thats around.

Or you could get them to look around now and spot any rubbish kicking around. Then explain that some of that rubbish will end up in any open hole in the ground.
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#8
lots of great advice on teaching archaeology in schools via this blog http://schoolsprehistory.wordpress.com/
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