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Weils disease....potential health hazard
#11
Reading Kevin's last post, I remember reading about Leptospirosis during the mid-eighties but never really hearing too much until the very early 90s. This prompted me to search on the net for various papers etc that might suggest why. I didn't really find anything that might suggest why it may have been overlooked. If anything, it hasn't. Its been known as a stock and agricultural workers disease for a number of years throughout the world. However, I did find this paper which I hope is of some interest.

http://www.hpa.org.uk/web/HPAwebFile/HPA...0660055286

:0
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#12
In terms of anthrax, I remember a note coming around a unit I was with a few years ago, where someone had become infected from a pit of Roman pig bones. Anthrax poisoning and viral meningitus followed.

Always wash your hands! And totally cover up on tanning and dye work sites - they're usually full of hilarious violently coloured nasty goo, and akalines that'll rip your skins off.

I've seen a few risk assessments over the years with these on, and Weils is usually mentioned if you're working in urban sitey areas. It depends if the risk assessment is covered properly at induction tho...
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#13
And while we are at it - ticks!! I have only ever once seen a risk assessment for an archaeological project that mentions the problem of ticks, despite that fact that many archaeology projects take place in prime 'tick country' .... you don't want to get bit by a tick and not know what to do and once again it is something that you should seek medical treatment after for the risk of Lymes disease...
With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
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#14
It's usually fairly obvious after a quick look around a new site if it's likely to be a rat haunt, but then I suppose that comes with experience and getting into the minds of the little b***ers. Dunno what other units do these days but here anyone going out to do a site recce has a multi-page form to fill in covering any hazards the combined disturbed minds in the office have managed to think up over the years (and a few nasty surprises we've experienced or read about), any former land uses, visible signs of services (remember to look up!), any biohazards, sharp things, potential chemicals/hazardous materials, uneven/tricky terrain, accessibility (for emergency services as well), safety of access, tricky turn-ins (police hate it when you block a main road with a jammed low-loader), tricky plant life, stuff like being downwind of a firing range etc etc. No fun any more but suppose have a pretty good safety record so far. Hope everyone does this! :face-approve:
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#15
Good point Kevin. Lymes disease is as serious and unpleasant as Weils.
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#16
We live aboard a narrowboat, and are scrupulous about hand-washing, particularly when we're out cruising or even handling ropes at the mooring. It's always a shock to us to see young children swimming in canals, especially in locks, in the summer. I always worry about Weils, but with common sense, we've been very lucky so far. Are ticks common in the UK? I have to say I've not seen one here, but in the US they're nasty and carry all sorts of lovely things. Having had a quick Wiki for tick-borne diseases, it seems mostly to be Lyme disease here but in the US there are quite a few tick-borne diseases.
Prime practitioner of headology, with a side order of melting glass with a stern glare.
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#17
Perhaps it's a regional thing in the UK? I live near the New Forest and that has a reasonable population of deer which harbour ticks. I've grown up knowing that ticks are a big deal - that you have to be on the watch for them and sort them out as soon as possible in case of Lyme's Disease.
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#18
mpoole Wrote:Are ticks common in the UK? I have to say I've not seen one here, but in the US they're nasty and carry all sorts of lovely things. Having had a quick Wiki for tick-borne diseases, it seems mostly to be Lyme disease here but in the US there are quite a few tick-borne diseases.

Lymes Disease Action maintain a website which tells everything you will ever need to know about ticks in the UK. Apparently there are ticks in London parks so its not just a countryside problem

http://www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk/ticks.htm
With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
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#19
I've worked in the back country, deserts and coastal areas doing surveys in California. We were briefed on the variety of ticks we may encounter. Long sleeves, shirts tucked into trousers, trousers tucked into socks, with Kevlar gators worn over and covering the calf were the norm for dressing. It was hot work, and hydration was always an issue. After completing the day's transects, we "buddied" up to de-tick. The Kevlar gators were to protect from Rattlesnake bites. You still had to watch where you put your hands....
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#20
I like the idea of buddying up to delouse each other. The kind of camaraderie archaeology encourages.

Snake bites are another matter!! I remember the old joke about what to do if you get bitten by a poisonous snake. Get a friend to suck out the poison!
And what happens if I get bit on the arse?. Then you find out who your friends are!!

(.....silence apart from the crying wind as the tumbeweed drifts by....)
With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
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