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Pottery ID
#1
Found this question on Britarch

from the Bury Archaeological Group

Anyhow we have recently found a couple of items on our annual dig that
> we don't know about. I was wondering if it is allowed to ask for help
> on this list. I have placed some photos on a flickr page
>
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/39069207@N04
>
> If anyone has any ideas any help will be gratefully received!


Constant development is the law of life, and a man who always tries to maintain his dogmas in order to appear consistent drives himself into a false position.
Mohandas Gandhi
For really I think that the poorest he that is in England hath a life to live, as the greatest he
Thomas Rainborough 1647
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#2
the alloy piece looks very much like a piece from a chess set
[:o)]

~~~~~
Thunder rolled. ... It rolled a six.
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#3
I would go for a drop drawer handle

Constant development is the law of life, and a man who always tries to maintain his dogmas in order to appear consistent drives himself into a false position.
Mohandas Gandhi
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#4
http://www.stokearchaeologysociety.org.u...finds.html



I wonder if it is an excise mark??



Glaze
The glaze is generally a yellowish brown, but it ranges from light olive yellow to very dark red. The fabric color can affect the glaze color, as can the presence of a red or yellow slip or slurry on some vessels. For example, a yellow slip can produce a honey-colored glaze. The glaze tends to be darker in areas where it pools, such as in cordons. The mottles in the glaze range from dark yellowish red or reddish brown to almost black. The mottles on vertical surfaces, such as tankard walls, tend to be streaked, while those on horizontal surfaces are more often speckled. Both surfaces are generally glazed, although on large vessels the exterior can be unglazed or only partially glazed. A red or yellow slip is sometimes applied to larger vessels, although pottery manufactured at Prescot in Merseyside had a pale yellow slip on the fine wares, not on the coarse vessels (Philpott 1985b:51-56; McNeil 1989:60).

Decoration
Most Manganese Mottled forms are undecorated. However, drinking vessels commonly have turned bands or cordons. These often occur just above the base and/or level with the top of the handle, but they can be found nearly anywhere on the vessel. Royal excise marks, such as AR and WR, are also found on drinking vessels (Elliott 1998:30; Gooder 1984:173-181; Philpott 1985b:51).

http://www.jefpat.org/diagnostic/Histori...ottled.htm

Constant development is the law of life, and a man who always tries to maintain his dogmas in order to appear consistent drives himself into a false position.
Mohandas Gandhi
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#5
Quote:quote:Originally posted by Wibblehead

the alloy piece looks very much like a piece from a chess set
[:o)]

I was thinking - dangerous I know - that the object was a coin - a 10 pence piece in new money no less.

Beer is your friend
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#6
Looks a bit like a seal martix.

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
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#7
looks like a picture on a computer
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