BAJR Federation Archaeology

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http://www.pasthorizons.com/index.php/archives/2497

In July this year, staff and students from the Flinders University Archaeology Department in South Australia participated in an 11-day ethnoarchaeology field school in the Northern Territory, Australia. This field school provided the opportunity for participants to work in close conjunction with members of two Aboriginal groups, the Ngaliwurru-Wuli Association at Timber Creek and the Larrakia Nation in Darwin. The primary aim of the project was to provide an environment in which up-and-coming archaeologists could experience first-hand a best-practice philosophy to conducting indigenous archaeology, one that takes an ?ask first? approach; working with and for indigenous communities throughout the archaeological process.

read on....

http://www.pasthorizons.com/index.php/archives/2497
This uterly fantastic, for a long time now I have been worried about the perpose of the Ngaliwurru-Wuli Association at Timber Creek and the Larrakia Nation in Darwi. Hopefully now they could become model indigenous communitiitites throughout the archaeological process for all students not only from Flinders but from all universities every where. well done pasthorizons. I almost feel like making a comment in Is there a bar in the site hut? Or can this be it? but I would probably end up with one of those convictions where you have to go on a register for life.
Best to quit while you are ahead. Don't you think?

Don't thank Past Horizons, though that is very kind of you. Perhaps give some consideration to those involved. :face-approve:
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[SIZE=3]It is hoped that by sharing this knowledge more people may be inspired to learn of the archaeological process and, in so doing, ensure that future indigenous archaeology is conducted and controlled by the Traditional Owners.
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Not sure I see what is “ensured” here, presumably I am a traditional owner or is this about landownership
given the tensions which exist in Australia between colonised and colonisers, in the context of which much archaeology - even in cities - has to be coordinated with the traditional owners; it is very easy to mock these protocols from the comfy seat of the colonising nation
I am not the colonising nation
Unitof1 Wrote:I am not the colonising nation
no
not as a nation of 1
I can almost accept that there is such a thing as ethoarchaeology very ish but this mob go of to do ethnology? but come back with
Quote:
[SIZE=3]The primary aim of the project was to provide an environment in which up-and-coming archaeologists could experience first-hand a best-practice philosophy to conducting indigenous archaeology, one that takes an ‘ask first’ approach; working with and for indigenous communities throughout the archaeological process.
[/SIZE]

So they end up with something called indigenous archaeology which presumably is some thing that the students cant do as they are presumably not indigenous so why they bloody doing what ever it is that they think that it is in the first place.

Unless possibly by doing the course, undertaking the protocalls you become indigenous or the indigenous become the coloninisers
You know I have to admit.... he has a point!!
No, its about respecting another peoples culture- some countries spend a lot a time on experimental archaeology. In Australia you can actually watch people using traditions that have been passed down each generation for at least the last 40,000 years. Also the belief systems behind methods that you cannot define from the archaeological record (ever heard an experimental archaeologist say that the choice of stone he is knapping was because it was pregnant and ready to give birth? Try sliding that one in your next eval find report. Also, it creates a bridge/understanding/ and trust between a generally European practice and an possible suspicious indigenous community (why do you want to know how long we've lived here?). Further, it may also encourage indigenous students to study or at least understand, appreciate archaeological/anthropological research.
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