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Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (ScARF)

Perhaps overlooked by many in UK archaeology, this exciting new organic framework model is moving forward in leaps and bounds. The concepts are best summed up in the mission statement, however, after discussion with Dr Jeff Sanders (who has promised to appear on BAJR Fed and discuss this further) there are so many options and ideas that can spin off from this.

ScARF itself is not an instigator of projects, but rather a facilitator of information about what is not known. The concept that has been worked on by several panels of experts is the identification of the unknown and the gaps in knowledge that could be filled by everyone from a member of the public to a contracting unit with all stops inbetween. However, this is no static framework, wedged in the past, rather an organic and evolving concept that is driven by what is done, and the feedback about this information. For example the research carried out by Rampart Scotland on Scottish Hillforts will add to knowledge and so by definition alter the research framework as more information comes in. The secret will be in COMMUNICATION!!! And more importantly, the commercial sector being able to insert research questions into projects ? supported by Curatorial Departments.

I.e.? if this site answers ?unknowns ? or at least adds the answer ? then the ScARF implementation should be useable to request this as part of an overarching requirement of all archaeology ? including the developmental side.


Read all about it here ? and do please question and comment. Lets get out of our Temporal contamination box and get excited about the unknown !

http://www.socantscot.org/scarf.asp


so in their own words... what are they about?

1. The Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (ScARF) will endeavour:
i) To identify the topics within Scottish archaeology that offer opportunities for the highest quality of research.
ii) To seek the assistance of, and to assist, all sectors of the archaeological community - e.g. academic, governmental, museum-based, commercial and voluntary - to identify and fulfil the research needs essential to the development of Scottish archaeology.
iii) To assist the wider community, including corporate bodies and government, to understand and appreciate the rich opportunities afforded by, and the potential of, Scottish archaeology.

2. ScARF will always seek to achieve these outcomes:

i) By engaging innovatively with the challenges Scottish archaeology faces, avoiding prescriptive or narrowly defined outcomes.
ii) Openly, transparently and offering clear accountability; widely disseminating its deliberations and outcomes by all suitable available means


3. In the future ScARF will seek:
i) To promote a continuing debate and updating process around ScARF to ensure that it remains both relevant and inclusive, and as a register of progress and endorsement.
ii) To continue to encourage the application of new approaches and techniques.
iii) To encourage collaborative, inter-disciplinary and inter-regional work and be a stimulus to the cross-fertilisation of ideas and the opening up of new avenues of funding.
Hi All,

Many thanks to David for starting this thread. The Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (or ScARF) is run by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, is funded by Historic Scotland, and we have support from across the sector.

We have a number of specialist panels looking at different aspects of Scotland's past who will be reporting back over 2010 (the results of their deliberations will go up on the site as a series of freely downloadable PDFs) - effectively we have asked these panels to critically review the current state of our knowledge for each theme and consider the key future research areas. There is a similarity here with the regional frameworks undertaken in England, and we are trying to build on the successes of their approach, while trying to minimise the drawbacks. The key challenge is to produce a framework that is neither anodyne, nor overly constrictive.

Please keep checking the website (currently we have info on who is on the panels and when they are meeting, along with a forum for discussion of research issues) as new info will be posted throughout the year, and I would appreciate any feedback and discussion (it would be particularly interesting to hear from people who have experience with the regional frameworks)

Cheers

Jeff
Thanks Jeff for coming on here to highlight the ScARF Project.

To show that this is a 'high powered' project, here are the panel for the Meso/Paleolithic Panel

The ScARF Palaeolithic and Mesolithic panel has been formed under the guidance of Alan Saville and Caroline Wickham-Jones.
Currently the panel consists of Steven Birch, Torben Bjarke Ballin, Clive Bonsall, Kevin Edwards, Nyree Finlay, Sin?ad McCartan, Steven Mithen, Kristian Pedersen, Alan Saville, Clive Waddington, Graeme Warren, and Caroline Wickham-Jones.
The panel met recently in late November and a workshop to discuss their findings will be held in May 2010.



The Forum is here:
http://www.socantscot.org/forum.asp


I don't think there is anything quite like this anywhere else. :face-approve:


The interesting thing for me (among many ) is this comment...


Quote:The key challenge is to produce a framework that is neither anodyne, nor overly constrictive.


When looking at this one for example....

http://www.kent.gov.uk/leisure_and_cultu..._docs.aspx
good as it is... it depends on updates rather than organic transformation.. and this seems to be one of the 'new' concepts for ScARF.



ps I ain't doing any them down at all... just saying this is an intersting way to look at Research Frameworks :face-huh:
** BUMP **

Looks like nobody uses the Frameworks in England... :face-stir:

SO I have asked at the HER Forum this question

Quote:This started from a look at the [SIZE=3]Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (ScARF) [SIZE=2]approach, creating a system that is reactive to new research.... so as a new piece of work happens, then the framework itself shifts to take account of it.. rather than have a system that changes every so often after a review. [/SIZE][/SIZE]

The question I have asked (and it seems BAJRites are scared to answer) is if and how people/contractors have used the Regional Frameworks. and how this fits with Curatorial burden / SMR(or HER) direction.

Are the English systems reactive to projects and are curators able to direct commercial work into research gaps - via conditions within briefs...? Indeed the broadest of questions is... Does it work?
Bumpity Bump....

I am guessing that people don't really do the Frameworks?