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Quote:quote:But the column was asking for more thoughtful, informed consideration.
I'll do my best. Big Grin The piece seemed to me like objective reporting right up to the sentence "People really wanted an archaeological drama, and with so much advance publicity, they had enough time to imagine what it would be like (typically, a cross between Time Team and a doctoral thesis.)"

The part outside the brackets makes total sense to me. The BBC hyped the series to the skies. British Archaeology itself carried a two-page spread on it. In my view anticipation of something brilliant accounts for the viewing figures for the first episode.

But why on earth would anyone be expecting a drama to be TT made more academic? And be shocked that it wasn't boring (as the piece goes on to claim)? That was the exact opposite of what the publicity promised. We were told that we could expect TT meets Indiana Jones, or TT crossed with CSI. It was to be archaeology sexed-up, made entertaining, and so on.

From that point on the Spoilheap piece is solidly partisan. It appears to reflect the intentions of the makers of Bonekickers, rather than addressing whether or not those intentions were actually achieved and if not, why not. Were viewers able to suspend disbelief? Did the dream world grip? If so, why have viewing figures fallen?
"The web attracts people who mistake their vomit for thought"

This is very true - have a read through any BBC 'Have Your Say' forum on news stories. If you took the views there to be representative of the population, you'd have to conclude that Britain consists of slavering right-wing imbeciles who think the phrase 'political correctness gone mad' can be used in a non-ironic manner without drawing withering contempt.

However, and this is an important point, whoever wrote Spoilheap seems to have missunderstood the nature of the internet. It is rapidly replacing TV and radio as the media, and not just the territory of a few detail obsessed geeks. It is democracy with a big 'D'. And if the people are speaking, it pays to at least listen to them, and not dismiss them with the wave of a glossy magazine page. It is also, for better or worse, a far more permanent medium than the casual usuer may suspect. Words in print may carry weight, but words on the internet have an inherent longevity.

Also, it certainly is not the only medium that attracts people who 'mistake their own vomit for thought'. I suggest that the BBC has a few too. Though unlike the internet, it costs an arm and a leg, and apparently supports those who are happy to insult people who have the temerity to ask for more intelligent programmes.

"This is archaeology as romance, the big vision thing, what in our dreams - if we have any soul left - we want it to be."

Apparently whoever wrote this article has decided that if you don't like Bonekickers, you have no soul. That if you don't fantasize about wearing a daft hat and poncing about in caves, routinely setting light to internationally important and unlikely aretefacts, you are some kind of intelectually challenged cretin who shouldn't be allowed near a trowel.

I need to make this plain, apparently, so will do so in bold letters, and apologise in advance to anyone who thinks it makes me look like I'm shouting. It's not that it's too imaginative - it's not imaginative enough. It's also just, and I can't emphasise this enough, not very good.

It's been regulalry refered to as 'car- crash television'. It's a shame that the archaeological advisor to the series has decided, instead of leaping clear of the accident, to sit amongst the wreckage and flames, cheerfully waving his big hat to the crowd of concerned onlookers, and trying to convince them that this was precisely how he wanted to spend his holiday, and anyone who didn't want to agree that it was a terribly good holiday was an obvious candidate for sectioning.

British Archaeology is a very good publication with an excellent reputation - the feature on archaeological radio programmes was a very good example of why archaeology works well on radio and in conjuntion with the internet, where you can see the locations and artefacts being spoken about.

I would also suggest that it illustrates that people are more than happy to use their imaginations when it comes to intelligent productions.

I'm sure the article was intended to be deliberately provocative and perhaps stimulate debate on the subject, but if that was the case it's a shame that the author didn't feel the strength of his convictions sufficiently to allow his name to appear under it.

Quote:quote:It's been regulalry refered to as 'car- crash television'. It's a shame that the archaeological advisor to the series has decided, instead of leaping clear of the accident, to sit amongst the wreckage and flames, cheerfully waving his big hat to the crowd of concerned onlookers, and trying to convinces them that this was precisely how he wanted to spend his holiday, and anyone who didn't want to agree that it was a terribly good holiday was an obvious candidate for sectioning.

I tried 3 times to read this out loud... however... every time I collapsed in tears of laughter, with the image it produced... the saddest thing is... its not wrong... it is hysterically funny... it is however absolutely bang on. Big Grin

I think you are right... the article was there to be challenged, to stimulate debate.. well.. it did... and the result?

ps.. you are not wrong about the posts on the BBC and fan site.. (I thought fan site was a bit of a misnomer... )

The article quotes only the first viewing figures .. which is funny, as it was written after a few episodes.. :face-huh: people had expectations. given the hype... we tuned in... then we tuned out.. now we drop out. I for one wish the author steps out and goes.. fair point... on x y and z but hey... these bits are true. Don't insult without expecting a reply.

"I don't have an archaeological imagination.."
Borekickers
Ah... me... well... it could not be worse than the Big Brother dig... (saw it on you tube)

Anyway.... its a lot of fuss about nothing - write an article .. challenge people .. get challenged.. seems fair.



"I don't have an archaeological imagination.."
Borekickers
grab the bottle... pad the walls and place a protective screen in fron of the TV... last episode tonight!

alternatively.. watch a dicovery channel rerun of something more interesting

"I don't have an archaeological imagination.."
Borekickers
Ah, I still won't get to watch it tonight (there are swords to play with!), but I will probably watch it later in the week.

I have to say that it has been swell, but the swelling's gone down..... (sorry TankGirl) Big Grin

What are we all going to do when it finishes! I wonder if, in setting the bar lower than we all would have perhaps wished, it has allowed us all to feel good about ourselves? [:p]
Wow, this thread is surely now more interesting than the programme. Mike Pitts may be gratified to know that I have finally got around to subscribing to his magazine, mostly because I admire his guts in running a piece in defence of Bonekickers.

I confess I only watched the first episode, as I was expecting it to be as good as 'Life on Mars', but the dialogue and characterisation were nowhere near as good. I probably just don't have enough imagination to be an archaeologist....
Quote:quote:Originally posted by Oxbeast

Wow, this thread is surely now more interesting than the programme. Mike Pitts may be gratified to know that I have finally got around to subscribing to his magazine, mostly because I admire his guts in running a piece in defence of Bonekickers.

I confess I only watched the first episode, as I was expecting it to be as good as 'Life on Mars', but the dialogue and characterisation were nowhere near as good. I probably just don't have enough imagination to be an archaeologist....

I believe I heard him commenting positively on Radio 4 before the 1st episode too (sorry if that wasn't you Mike! the traffic was bad!)

I'm sure I don't have enough imagination, but then 'consultants' don't even exist on the programme! So maybe I'm imagining I exist? Or that I'm an archaeologist?
Quote:quote:Originally posted by oldgirl
[brI believe I heard him commenting positively on Radio 4 before the 1st episode too (sorry if that wasn't you Mike! the traffic was bad!)

It was. I watched the first episode mainly because he was so enthusiastic about it. I'm beginning to wonder if it wasn't reviewed in the rosy glow of discovering that archaeology has finally become attractive enough to warrant it's own TV drama series.

On a positive note, maybe archaeology will have taken over from police shows in 20 years time (alternatively, we'll all be watching Double Entry! - swash-buckling adventure on the wide accountant-sea.)

D. Vader
Senior Consultant

Vader Maull & Palpatine
Archaeological Consultants

Don't make me destroy you, Curator
Ot the heartwarming comedy with Mike Meyers and Eddie Murphy playing a couple of diggers trying to rectify a glaring error in a context record sheet, and the hysterical antics as they try to convince the Project Officer to let them have the site pencil rubber...

"I don't have an archaeological imagination.."
Borekickers
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